Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer



WISE Related Minor Planet Electronic Circulars

Glossary:
MOID = Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance, or how close the object and the Earth can come if the timing is just right (or wrong).
PHA = Potentially Hazardous Asteroid, brighter than H=22 with a MOID less than 0.05 AU
  1. 2016 WF9, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0292 AU. The perihelion is at 0.9942 AU, while the aphelion is at 6.8 AU.
  2. 2016 VM6, an NEO with perihelion at 1.23 AU. The eccentricity is 0.5.
  3. 2016 WS1, not an NEO but an object with a rather cometary orbit, having semi-major axis a=13.3 AU, eccentricity e=0.873, and inclination i=53 degrees. It is 1.8 AU from the Sun on 15-Nov-2016 and outbound.
  4. 2016 VK6, an NEO with a MOID of 0.0493 AU, but an optical absolute magnitude H=23 which is too faint to count as a PHA. However, the range at which WISE detected this object suggests a diameter bigger than 150 m and then a low albedo.
  5. 2006 DC158, not an NEO or a WISE discovery, but rather a highly eccentric object recovered by WISE after nearly 11 years of non-observation. The period is 5.36 years, and the perihelion is 1.427 AU from the Sun.
  6. 2000 AC229, not an NEO or a WISE discovery, but rather a highly eccentric and highly inclined object that had not been observed for more than 16 years when WISE saw it.
  7. 2016 UA107, a Mars-Earth-Venus orbit crosser with perihelion at 0.61 AU and an eccentricity of 0.77. The MOID is 0.3275 AU.
  8. Comet C/2016 U1 (NEOWISE), a faint comet with perihelion at 0.319 AU. The predicted perihelion passage is 14 Jan 2017.
  9. 2016 TJ18, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0103 AU. The perihelion is just under 1 AU, and the aphelion at 3.8 AU.
  10. 2016 SH45, with a MOID of 0.2297 AU and a perihelion at 1.15 AU.
  11. 2016 SG45, with a MOID of 0.1809 AU and a perihelion at 1.16 AU.
  12. 2016 SA36, a medium-sized asteroid with perihelion at 1.476 AU, so not an NEO. But it is a Mars and Jupiter crosser, so it may turn out to be a comet or a dead comet nucleus.
  13. 2016 SG1, a large NEO that crosses the orbits of Mars, Earth and Venus. The MOID is 0.3720 AU. Given the distance from the Earth at the time of the WISE detection, this is probably larger than 1 km. According to NEODys this object has a small but non-zero chance of hitting the Earth, so more observations are warranted.
  14. 2016 QM11, a highly eccentric, medium inclination NEO that crosses the orbits of Earth, Mars and Juptier. The MOID is 0.1066. WISE picked this up 1.15 AU from the Earth, and a thermophysical model of the IR flux says the diameter is 1.255+14%-4% km. Hence this is definitely one of the few NEOs bigger than 1 km that remained to be discovered. This was on the JPL list of possible impactors for a few hours, due to future encounters with Jupiter.
  15. 2016 QU1, a highly eccentric, medium inclination NEO that crosses the Mars, Earth, Venus and Mercury orbits. The MOID is 0.2510 AU. The current observational arc spans 5 days, and the object is approaching the Sun at 2 degrees/day, so further observations would be very useful.
  16. 2016 PG67, a Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.2383 AU.
  17. 2015 TF, look for K15T00F in this daily orbit update, discovered by PANSTARRS in 2015, was actually seen by WISE in 2010 with 6 observations covering 11 hours. An Earth, Mars and Venus crosser. The MOID is 0.0497 AU, but the absolute magnitude is too faint at H=22.2 so it is not classified as a PHA. Analysis of the IR data from WISE and NEOWISE-R says the diameter is 217 meters ± 11 percent.
  18. 2012 UR158, a PHA with a very high eccentricity (0.86) and a small MOID of 0.0034 AU, was recovered by WISE after a 3.5 year gap in observations.
  19. 2016 OY2, an Earth and Mars crosser with perihelion at 0.91 AU and a MOID of 0.067 AU. This was discovered by WISE far in the South at declination -74o.
  20. 2016 KL1, an Aten and PHA with a MOID of 0.0238 AU. This also crosses the Venus orbit.
  21. 2016 JU38, an Earth and Mars crosser with a high eccentricity and pretty high inclination. The MOID is 0.1208 AU.
  22. 2016 HN3, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0302. The perihelion is at 0.96 AU.
  23. 2016 GB241, buried in a Daily Orbit Update (look for K16GO1B), is a Mars and Jupiter crosser with an eccentricity of 0.63 and semi-major axis of 3.49 AU. Just barely an NEO with perihelion at 1.29 AU.
  24. 2016 GU216, a bright Mars, Earth and Venus crosser with a large eccentricity of 0.72. The MOID is 0.2828 AU.
  25. 2016 FG15, a rather eccentric Apollo asteroid with a MOID of 0.2306 AU. The eccentricity is 0.71.
  26. 2016 FO12, an Apollo asteroid with a very low MOID of 0.0012 AU. The orbit has a low inclination but a high eccentricity. The IR data show that the diameter is around 200 meters, and later astrometry made 2016 FO12 a "virtual impactor", which meant that orbits consistent with the available data can hit the Earth. But the uncertainties were still large, so the chance of an impact was low. The current data predicts no impacts in the next century.
  27. 2016 DL , an Aten class PHA with a MOID of 0.0473 AU, and an eccentricity of 0.47. The perihleion is at 0.378 AU, slightly inside Mercury's orbit, while the aphelion is 1.051 AU.
  28. Comet C/2016 C2 (NEOWISE), a parabolic comet with perihelion at 1.57 AU coming up April 19. Update: 2016 March 2.
  29. 2016 BC14, an Aten type PHA with a MOID of 0.0112 AU. The period is 0.82 years.
  30. 2015 PP291, first seen by Pan-STARRS in August 2015, then by WISE January 2016. The eccentricity is high at 0.80, so the perihelion is well inside the orbit of Venus. The MOID is 0.1561 AU.
  31. Comet C/2016 B1 (NEOWISE), a parabolic comet with a perihelion distance of 4.2 AU.
  32. 2002 AO11, recovered by WISE after 14 years without observations, is an Aten asteroid with a MOID of 0.0027 AU. Too faint to be a PHA at H = 22.7 mag.
  33. 2016 AA10, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0432 AU. The eccentricity is high, it is an Earth and Mars crosser.
  34. 2016 AZ8, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0297 AU.
  35. 2015 YC18, an Earth and Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.0515 AU and perihelion at 0.9209 AU. The optical brightness is very low, with H=25.1 mag, so this object probably has a low albedo.
  36. Comet C/2015 YG1 (NEOWISE), a parabolic comet with a perihelion distance of 1.70 AU and an inclination of 52 degrees.
  37. 2015 SS20 = 2015 WL16. This is a very dark object with a MOID of 0.0292 AU. It was first seen by WISE on 23 Sep 2015, but nobody was able to get followup detections. Thus the object was designated 2015 SS20 with no orbit solution. So I searched the WISE frames that might have contained the object and I found several more frames with 3 sigma detections, and then with this longer arc Dave Tholen found the source as a very faint moving blip on MegaCam frames he had taken in October. Meanwhile a second short arc from WISE had been designated as 2015 WL16 with no orbit. But now they are all linked for this potentially hazardous asteroid with a very low albedo. A thermophysical analysis based on the two NEOWISE epochs gives a best fit diameter of 175 meters and albedo just under 5 percent.
  38. Comet C/2015 X8 (NEOWISE), a parabolic comet with a retrograde orbit (inclination 155 degrees). The perihelion distance is 1.21 AU.
  39. 2015 XY378, an Aten asteroid with a semi-major axis of 0.71 AU, just inside the Venus orbit. The eccentricity is large at 0.49, so this crosses the orbits of the Earth, Venus and Mercury. The Earth MOID is 0.1977 AU.
  40. 2015 WM16, an Earth and Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.0818 AU. The inclination and eccentricity are fairly high.
  41. 2015 XB130, a PHA seen in two frames by Pan-STARRS on 12/1, then 9 times by WISE on 12/3, and several other ground-based observatories. The MOID is 0.0415 AU.
  42. 2015 VZ145, seen twice by Pan-STARRS in October, then 6 times by WISE in November, has small MOID of 0.0143 AU. The inclination is low, and the eccentricity is high: 0.54. The perihelion is just inside 1 AU. The optical brightness is too low to count as a PHA.
  43. 2003 WG166, which was tracked for 4 weeks in 2003 but not seen since, was picked by WISE after 12 years. This object is almost resonant with Jupiter, but its high inclination and eccentricity reduce the perturbations on its orbit.
  44. 2015 VR2, a high eccentricity Mars crosser that gets out close to Jupiter's orbit.
  45. 2015 US81, just barely an NEO with perihelion at 1.285 AU.
  46. 2007 WE55, an NEO recovered by WISE after 7.5 years unseen.
  47. 2015 TW346, an object with a fairly high eccentricity of e = 0.6, and a MOID of 0.3853 AU.
  48. 2015 TK237, with a MOID of 0.0358, just missing being a PHA because its H absolute magnitude is 22.3. My best fit to the optical H magnitude and the WISE IR data gives a low albedo and a diameter well above the 140 meter theshold for PHA, but the uncertainties are big enough to allow pretty good fits with diameters below the threshold.
  49. 2015 SF20, an Earth and Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.0553 AU, just misses being a PHA.
  50. 2010 UB8, an asteroid discovered by WISE in 2010, has been recovered by WISE in 2015 after a 5 year gap with no observations. The error in the predicted position at recovery was 5 degrees.
  51. 2015 RR150, a PHA with moderately high inclination and eccentricity. The MOID is 0.0240 AU.
  52. 2015 RS83, a very high eccentricity (e=0.75) Earth crosser with MOID = 0.1533 AU.
  53. 2015 RA36, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0468. The orbit is fairly eccentric and inclined.
  54. 2006 UR127, recovered by WISE after 9 years, MOID = 0.1865 AU.
  55. 2011 HJ61, recovered by WISE after 4 years, MOID = 0.1226 AU.
  56. 2015 QM3 is a fairly large Aten class asteroid whose orbit crosses the orbital radii of Mercury, Venus and the Earth. The MOID is 0.0610 AU.
  57. 2015 OS35, a fairly eccentric Mars crosser with a perihelion at 1.07 AU. The MOID is 0.2541 AU.
  58. 2015 OA22 is an eccentric, high inclination object with a perihelion just outside the Earth's orbit and an aphelion beyond Jupiter's orbit. The MOID is 0.0670.
  59. 2015 MQ130 is a Mars crosser with a perihelion just outside the Earth's orbit. But the MOID is 0.2687 AU.
  60. 2015 GN50. It must be spring cleaning day on the NEO confirmation page, because this MPEC is titled "46 New NEOs". 2015 GN50 was only observed by WISE with a total span of 0.5 days. The MOID is 0.0554 AU.
  61. 2015 JF11 is another of the 46 new NEOs. Only observed by WISE over a 1.25 day arc, its MOID is 0.0337 AU and it is listed as a PHA in the MPC database.
  62. 2015 KL157, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0091 AU. Based on the IR data, this object is dark and nearly 1 km in diameter.
  63. 2015 HA182, discovered 21 Apr 2015 by WISE, with ground-based followup giving a 10 day arc. Update 11 Jun 2015: 2009 HE = 2015 HA182, with a 1.48 year period. So WISE recovered this object 6 years after the last previous observation. MOID = 0.0713 AU.
  64. 2015 KH157, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0154 AU.
  65. Comet 141P/Machholz, a periodic comet with a 5.25 year period, discovered in 1994 but last observed in 2005, was recovered by WISE with 28 observations.
  66. Comet P/2015 J3 (NEOWISE), a periodic comet with a 6.36 year period, e = 0.56, i = 8.1 degrees.
  67. 2015 GK50, with a high eccentricity object swinging from almost Jupiter's orbit with aphelion at 5.1 AU to nearly the Earth's orbit with perihelion at 1.03 AU. The MOID is 0.2368 AU.
  68. 2015 GJ46, an object with a rather eccentric orbit (e = 0.77) that crosses the orbits of Mars, Earth and Venus. The MOID is 0.236 AU.
  69. 2015 FT344, a Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.2020 AU.
  70. 2015 FD341, a large Mars, Earth, Venus and Mercury crosser with a MOID of 0.1241 AU. It has a period less than 1 year, so it is an Aten class NEO. Update 3/20/15: A precovery by NEOWISE in 2014 which I found while searching for data to do a thermal fit then allowed a 1 hour arc from Siding Springs in 2013 to be added. Now a 3 opposition object with a 2 year arc. The best fit is a diameter of 900 m and an albedo of 0.15, but the Monte Carlo says the mean over all likelihood weighted distributions of poorly determined parameters is 750+/-130 m diameter.
  71. Comet 2015 G1, picked up by WISE on April 5, turns out to be Comet P/2008 S1 (Catalina-McNaught). Perihelion distance is 1.19 AU, and the period is between 6.74 and 6.76 years.
  72. 2015 FU332, a big, optically bright Mars, Earth and Venus crosser with a MOID of 0.2703 AU. The eccentricity and inclination are high. WISE discovered this at ecliptic latitude 67 degrees.
  73. 2015 FE120, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0116 AU.
  74. 2015 FY117, a Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.1494 AU.
  75. 2015 DX198, a Mars crosser with a perihelion at 1.024 AU and a MOID of 0.074 AU.
  76. 2015 BS514: Pan-STARRS picked this one up before WISE scanned over it. It is a Mars crosser with a perihelion at 1.3283 AU.
  77. 2015 BV512, a Mars and Jupiter crosser with a perihelion at 1.3337 AU.
  78. 2015 AK280, a high eccentricity (e = 0.7) PHA with a MOID of 0.0494 AU.
  79. 2002 GP186, recovered not discovered by WISE, 13 years after the first observations. It is an Earth crosser with a MOID of 0.0809 AU. The position based on the 2002 observations was off by 25 degrees.
  80. 2015 AY245, a PHA with MOID = 0.0190. Perihelion is at 1.003 AU.
  81. 2015 AC17, Mars crosser with MOID = 0.2409.
  82. 2014 YR43, a high eccentricity Earth and Mars crosser with MOID=0.31 AU. The eccentricity is 0.62.
  83. 2014 YS14, an Earth crossing NEO with a perihelion distance of 0.837 AU, and an eccentricity of 0.657. No MPEC was issued although one was warranted. Update 16-Jan-2015: Dave Tholen reobserved this object giving a 23 day arc, and gets orbital elements with argument of perihelion = 13.89320, semi-major axis = 2.4636696, longitude of ascending node = 124.56343, eccentricity = 0.6603313, inclination = 18.28931, and mean anomaly = 345.01793 at JD=2457000.5.
  84. 2014 YJ14, a large NEO with high eccentricity, e = 0.82. The perihelion is at 0.4 AU. The MOID is 0.1096 AU.
  85. 2014 XX31, a large bright NEO with a high eccentricity of 0.87. Its perihelion is inside Mercury's orbit, while its aphelion is outside Jupiter's orbit. The MOID is 0.4726 AU. This is the 51st WISE-related MPEC in the year since NEOWISE-R restarted the survey.
  86. 2014 XX7, a Mars crosser with MOID = 0.1645 AU.
  87. 2014 XQ7, a Mars, Earth and Venus crosser with a MOID of 0.3113. The eccentricity of e = 0.75 is quite high.
  88. 2014 VP35, with perihelion at 0.9552 and a MOID of 0.0262, is a bit too faint optically with H=22.6 to qualify as a PHA.
  89. 2014 UH210, an eccentric Earth & Mars crosser with a MOID = 0.0987 AU. Perihelion is at 0.8858 AU, aphelion at 4.2392 AU.
  90. 2014 UF206, largish Mars crosser with MOID = 0.1315 AU.
  91. 2014 UG176, and Earth and Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.1611 AU.
  92. 2014 TJ64, Mars crosser with MOID = 0.1537 AU.
  93. 2014 TF64, Earth and Mars crosser with MOID = 0.131 AU. Hign inclination = 53o.
  94. 2014 TW57, a Venus, Earth and Mars crosser with a MOID = 0.0569 AU. The semi-major axis is 2.02 and the eccentricity is 0.72.
  95. 2014 SR339, Mars crosser with perihelion at 1.15 AU, 15 observations by NEOWISE spanning 5 days plus 9 ground-based followup observations. This is appears to be close to a kilometer in diameter or bigger. Update: 11 Nov 2014: new orbit solution gives a = 1.2989, e = 0.3037, i = 29.790. So now an Earth and Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.036 and big enough to be a PHA.
  96. 2014 RH12, with a high eccentricity of 0.53, a perihelion at q = 1.01 AU, and a MOID of 0.0451 AU. Discovered by WISE at short range, Δ = 0.1 AU. The absolute magnitude is H = 22.83 which is too faint to qualify as a PHA, and the IR flux implies a small diameter, D = 71 ± 9 meters.
  97. 2014 QH433, a Mars crosser with a = 3.17, e = 0.56. The perihelion is at 1.40 AU so not an NEO.
  98. 2014 QK433, Mars crosser with a = 2.96, e = 0.60. The perihelion is at 1.19 AU, and the MOID is 0.1790 AU.
  99. 2007 RU10, recovered by WISE 7 years after it was last seen in 2007. A high eccentricity Mars and Earth crosser with a MOID = 0.0970.
  100. 2014 PP69, an object in a comet-like orbit with a = 12.6, e = 0.901, and inclination i = 93o, but no activity has been seen so it gets an asteroidal designation. MOID = 0.4354.
  101. 2014 PF68, a Mars crosser with a high eccentricity of e = 0.602. MOID = 0.1781.
  102. 2014 PC68, a Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.1047.
  103. 2010 ST16 = 2014 OT392. This object was recovered by WISE as 2014 OT392 but its orbit agrees with 2010 ST16. A high eccentricity NEO with MOID = 0.0961 AU.
  104. 2014 OR2, an asteroid in a comet-like orbit with a = 4.57 AU, e = 0.59, and inclination = 12o.
  105. 2014 OZ1, a Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.1982 AU.
  106. 2014 OY1, PHA with MOID = 0.0426 AU. Earth crosser with high eccentricity: e = 0.625.
  107. 2014 NM64, which fails to be a PHA due to its very low albedo leading to a faint optical appearance. MOID = 0.0489 AU, a = 2.84 AU, e = 0.626 and inclination 28.8o. 24 observations by WISE over 5 days. The Horizons database at JPL gives a brighter magnitude, H = 21.4 instead of 22.6, and thermal analysis of the WISE data says the diameter is about 200 meters.
  108. 2014 NE64, Mars crosser with semi-major axis a = 2.12 AU and e = 0.433. Probably big and dark since WISE picked it up at a range of 1.5 AU.
  109. 2014 NC64, Earth and Mars crosser with eccentricity e = 0.634. The MOID is 0.1972 AU.
  110. Comet C/2014 N3 (NEOWISE), a parabolic comet with perihelion at 3.846 AU, and an inclination of 61.7o. Discovered by NEOWISE on the 4th of July.
  111. 2014 NF3, an Venus, Earth and Mars crosser with MOID = 0.2146 AU.
  112. 2014 MK60, a PHA with a MOID = 0.0185 AU. This is an Aten with a period of 0.89 years.
  113. 2014 MQ18, very large NEO with a MOID of 0.2020 AU, discovered at 1.6 AU range. Eccentricity = 0.616, period = 5.3 years.
  114. Comet P/2014 L2 (NEOWISE), a comet discovered near perihelion at 2.1 AU from the Sun. Update 7-Jul-2014: this MPEC lists 4 different orbits which is a bit unusual. The best estimates give a = 6.26 to 6.28 AU, and eccentricity e = 0.6445, with perihelion at 2.23 AU.
  115. 2014 LQ25, appears to be a large (1 km) object with a very low albedo. It has a semi-major axis of a = 2.11 AU, an eccentricity of 0.69 and an inclination of 34 degrees, so it is a Mars, Earth and Venus orbit crosser. The MOID is 0.0909 AU.
  116. 2014 KG2, an object with a comet-like orbit, e = 0.78, a = 6.40.
  117. 2014 JN57, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0481 AU. Update: reobserved by Dave Tholen 21-23 Jan 2015, and the MOID has changed to 0.0514 AU.
  118. 2014 JH57, a very large NEO with a very eccentric orbit, e = 0.87. The perihelion is at q = 0.36 AU, so it crosses the orbits of all the inner planets.
  119. 2014 JL25, with a perihelion at 0.9967 and a MOID of 0.0135 AU, is a bit too faint to qualify as a PHA. However, the optical magnitudes are quite faint, so this probably darker and larger than the standard analysis suggests.
  120. 2014 HJ129, Mars crosser, MOID = 0.1700 AU. Probably pretty dark since the reflected optical light is faint. Update 5 Aug 2014: this has now been identified with 2010 AQ81, another WISE NEO. The orbit is now very well known, with MOID = 0.2117 AU.
  121. 2014 HQ124, an Earth and Venus crossing Aten with period = 0.79 years, and a PHA with MOID = 0.0083 AU. It will get as close as 3.2 lunar distances from the Earth on 8 June 2014.
  122. 2014 EQ49, a PHA with MOID = 0.0438. Probably dark with a diameter of a few hundred meters.
  123. 2014 EN45, high eccentricity (e = 0.57) Mars crosser. Earth MOID = 0.1560. Could be very dark.
  124. 2014 ED, high eccentricity (e = 0.64) Mars, Earth and Venus crosser, MOID = 0.37 AU.
  125. COMET C/2014 C3 (NEOWISE). Parabolic retrograde comet with perihelion at 1.87 AU.
  126. 2014 CF14 is an Earth and Mars crosser, bigger than 1 km. Luckily the MOID is 0.1516 AU.
  127. 2014 CY4, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0399, and e = 0.84. This one has a fairly large relative velocity when close to the Earth, and looks to be quite dark, increasing the hazard it presents.
  128. 2014 BF63 is an object with a comet-like orbit, a = 5.17 and e = 0.67.
  129. 2014 BE63 is a Mars and Earth crosser with an eccentricity of 0.64, and a MOID of 0.1328. Ground-based followup with the Cerro Tololo 4 meter at magnitude 23.7!
  130. 2014 BG60 is a Mars and Jupiter crosser. The WISE estimated optical magnitude is much brighter than the reported optical magnitudes so this probably has a low albedo.
  131. 2009 UX17 was recovered by WISE on 18-19 Jan 2014. WISE also observed this source 16 Feb to 5 Mar 2010. This should be an interesting case for thermal modeling with multiple infrared apparitions. But it is not an Earth crosser and has a MOID of 0.1485 AU, so it is not currently a threat.
  132. 2014 AA53, Earth crosser with a MOID of 0.1402.
  133. 2014 AZ52, comet-like orbit with a perihelion at 1.48 AU.
  134. 2014 AQ46, a Mars crosser with a MOID of 0.2039. This object loitered at 92 degrees elongation for several days, so WISE got a 5 day arc by itself.
  135. 2013 YP139, a PHA with a MOID of 0.0033 AU. The velocity relative to the Earth at the MOID is 16 km/sec. This object is big and dark emitting lots of IR. WISE is back in business finding NEOs.
  136. 2011 BN59, an NEO with a comet-like orbit, a=4 AU, e=0.7. This was found in the last batch of tracklets from NEOWISE.
  137. 2011 BY24, an Earth crosser with a MOID = 0.0171 that probably should be a PHA because the IR estimated magnitude is 1.3 mags brighter than the optical magnitude, indicating a diameter bigger than the PHA threshold but with a low albedo.
  138. 2011 AH37, an Earth crossing PHA with MOID = 0.0348
  139. 2011 AT4, with perihelion distance = 1.42 AU, so it is only nearly an NEO
  140. 2010 YD3, probably a big dark NEO since optical followup failed, 40 WISE observations spanning 6.5 days. Update: 110 observations by WISE from 28 Nov 2010 to 26 Jan 2011, and observed by CTIO in the optical in April 2011. A rotating, cratered thermophysical model gives a 500-1500 meter diameter. MOID = 0.196.
  141. 2007 TR65, WISE recovered this Mars, Earth and Venus crosser last seen in Nov 2007
  142. 2010 YC1, a darkish Earth crosser, MOID = 0.1644
  143. 2010 XY82, an NEO with perihelion distance of 1.13 AU, but no MPEC was issued. Update 29 Jul 2013: recovered by Dave Tholen, MOID = 0.2943.
  144. 2010 XP69, a darkish PHA, MOID=0.0127
  145. 2010 XZ67, MOID=0.0648
  146. 2010 WE9, MOID=0.2479
  147. 2010 UB8, probably a big dark NEO since the WISE estimated R was 18th mag while the ground-based measured R was about 21st mag. MOID = 0.1928
  148. 2010 UY6, a fairly dark almost PHA, MOID = 0.0593
  149. 2010 TK7, another object with a period of 1.00 years, MOID = 0.0837. This is the first WISE related MPEC based only on post-cryogen data.
  150. 2010 SZ16, PHA, MOID = 0.0405
  151. 2010 SO16, PHA, period of 1 year, MOID = 0.0269
  152. 2010 BK118, a blast from the past, retrograde cometary orbit with perihelion at 6.12 AU
  153. 2010 QA5, Mars crosser, MOID = 0.0587, probably pretty dark since optical observers are getting fluxes two magnitudes fainter than the WISE estimate
  154. 2010 QE2, quite a big NEO, high inclination Mars and Earth crosser, MOID = 0.0573
  155. 2010 QD2, big NEO; a Mars, Earth and Venus crosser, MOID = 0.0706
  156. 2010 PY75, Mars, Earth and Venus crosser, MOID = 0.2433
  157. Comet P/2010 P4 (WISE), 7.5 year period, eccentricity only 0.5. Orbit update: 10/13/2010
  158. 2010 PU66, Earth crosser, MOID=0.1449
  159. 2010 PW58, Aten, PHA, MOID = 0.0219
  160. 2010 PP58, MOID=0.0115 but a hair too dim optically to be a PHA.
  161. 2010 PO58, 121 degree inclination, ranges from 3 to 14.5 AU from the Sun.
  162. 2010 PM58, MOID=0.0975, Earth crosser. Update 01-Aug-2013: recovered by Dave Tholen, MOID = 0.0969.
  163. 2010 OK126, Mars crosser, MOID=0.1465
  164. 2010 OH126, Mars and Earth crosser, MOID = 0.0639
  165. 2010 ON101, PHA, MOID = 0.0451
  166. 2010 OM101, cometary orbit, perihelion at 2.13 AU
  167. 2010 OL101, MOID=0.3122
  168. 2010 OF101, Aten, MOID = 0.0633, WISE data for 10 days plus ground-based followup
  169. 2010 OE101, Mars crosser
  170. 2010 OD101, Mars crosser, MOID = 0.1906
  171. 2010 OC101, Earth crosser, MOID = 0.0902
  172. 2010 OB101, Earth crosser, MOID = 0.1111
  173. 2010 OA101, high eccentricity, high inclination, comet-like orbit
  174. 2010 OL100, Mars and Earth crosser, MOID=0.1284
  175. 2010 OS22, big NEO, MOID = 0.1647, discovered by LINEAR with a 48 minute arc, then WISE got 7 points over 11 hours 5 days later
  176. 2010 OE22, MOID = 0.1772
  177. 2004 XK50, WISE recovered this PHA so it now has a good orbit, MOID = 0.0426
  178. 2010 OR1, comet-like orbit, perihelion at 2.05 AU. Update: this object is also 2010 BY83, a designation given to a WISE discovery in January.
  179. 2010 NY65, Aten, PHA, MOID = 0.0168. Update: MOID = 0.0173, period = 1.00 years. WISE radiometric albedo = 7%, diameter = 228 m.
  180. 2010 NG3, big NEO, MOID = 0.1418
  181. 2010 NB2, Mars, Earth & Venus crosser, MOID = 0.0966
  182. 2010 NZ1, Mars, Earth & Venus crosser, MOID = 0.2691
  183. 1995 KG1, recovered after 15 years.
  184. 2004 RR109, WISE recovered this object so it now has a good orbit based on a six year arc.
  185. 2010 NW1, eccentric orbit for an asteroid, an NEO that gets out to 5 AU.
  186. 2010 NV1, retrograde comet-like orbit with perihelion at 9.3 AU.
  187. 2010 NU1, Mars, Earth & Venus crosser
  188. 2010 NT1, Mars crosser
  189. Comet P/2010 N1 (WISE), Jupiter family comet. Update: 6-Jun-2016 - identified with 2016 GE216.
  190. 2010 NJ1, Aten, MOID = 0.1463
  191. 2010 NH1, Mars and Jupiter crosser
  192. 2010 NG1, Aten, MOID = 0.0817. Update 6/21/13, , MOID = 0.0816.
  193. 2010 MB113, MOID = 0.2232
  194. 2010 MA113, MOID = 0.0815
  195. 2010 MZ112, Mars, Earth & Venus crosser, MOID = 0.2209
  196. 2010 MY112, MOID = 0.1914
  197. 2010 LU134, MOID = 0.1191
  198. 2010 MU112, Mars and Earth crosser, MOID = 0.1919 Update 2/12/13, now a PHA with MOID = 0.0011.
  199. 2010 MU111, Mars and Earth crosser, MOID = 0.0556
  200. 2010 MR87, MOID=0.1497, picked up by WISE at 80 degrees ecliptic latitude
  201. Comet C/2010 L5 (WISE), fairly bright (for WISE) parabolic comet, with m=18 at discovery. Now outbound, and it will be visible to WISE again in late July. Updates: 7/15/10, 7/23/10
  202. 2010 LJ109, ranging from 9-17 AU from the Sun
  203. 2010 LV108, Mars and Earth crosser, MOID = 0.0203
  204. 2010 LU108, Mars, Earth & Venus crosser, MOID = 0.1138
  205. 2010 LT108, Mars and Earth crosser, MOID = 0.1387
  206. 2010 LS108, Mars crosser
  207. Comet C/2010 L4 (WISE), parabolic comet coming into the night sky but past perihelion. Updates: 6/22/10, 7/2/10, 7/15/10, 7/23/10, 8/6/10
  208. 2010 LL68, small Mars and Earth crosser, MOID=0.1387
  209. 2010 LK68, small Mars, Earth & Venus crosser, MOID=0.0255
  210. 2010 LJ68, small Mars and Earth crosser, MOID=0.0361
  211. Comet P/2002 LN13 = 2010 L2 (LINEAR), WISE recovered this object discovered as an asteroid 8 years ago by LINEAR and showed it was a comet
  212. 2010 LG64, WISE only 2.3 day arc, Mars and Earth crosser, MOID=0.1175
  213. 2010 LF64, WISE only 2 day arc
  214. 2010 LJ61, Mars, Earth & Venus crosser, MOID=0.0727
  215. 2010 LG61, small Aten, short WISE only arc, WISE should revisit in July Update: 7/30/10, new WISE data now give a=7.11 AU. Quite a change!
  216. 2010 LE15, Aten, PHA, MOID=0.0230, WISE will revisit in late July
  217. 2010 KH, a biggish NEO, 21 observations by WISE over 3.4 days
  218. 2010 LR 33, a big PHA with MOID=0.0282
  219. 2010 LQ33, an NEO observed by WISE for 5 days. Update 01-Sep-2014: reobserved by Dave Tholen giving an improved orbit: Mars crosser with MOID = 0.2285.
  220. 2010 LP33, eccentric orbit with a=4.5 AU
  221. 2010 KY127, a Mars, Earth, Venus & Mercury crosser, about 2 km diameter
  222. Comet P/2010 L1 (WISE), 8 year period, Updates: 6/14/10, 7/15/10, 9/3/10, 9/3/10 orbit linked with asteroid 2002 Q16, so this is now Comet P/2002 Q16 (WISE)
  223. 2010 KK127, an NEO tracked by WISE for 17 days as it stayed 90 degrees behind the Sun
  224. 2010 EJ104, WISE observations of a previously found object in a comet-like orbit
  225. 2010 LM14, Earth & Venus crosser
  226. 2010 LH14, MOID = 0.0552
  227. Comet P/2010 K2 (WISE), Period 5.05 years, also an NEO, Updates: 7/8/10, P=4.98 years; 3/20/15, the Comet 2015 B3 seen by PanSTARRS is really 2010 K2 coming around again one period later.
  228. 2010 KZ117, nearly a km in diameter, MOID = 0.1669. Update: recovered in Feb, Apr and May 2013 by Dave Tholen at Mauna Kea.
  229. 2010 KB61, Earth and Mars crosser
  230. 2010 KR59, orbit from 10.65 to 75 AU from the Sun, currently 12.9 AU away
  231. 2010 AU118, a blast from the past, 19 observations spanning 1.4 days only from WISE, a NEO larger than 1 km, WISE should see it again in early June
  232. 2010 AR85, a blast from the past, 10 observations spanning 1.7 days only from WISE, a NEO larger than 1 km
  233. 2010 AQ81, a blast from the past: Seen by WISE 22 times over a week during IOC, this NEO is now designated. Update 5 Aug 2014: this has now been identified with 2014 HJ129, another WISE NEO. The orbit is now very well known, with MOID = 0.2117 AU.
  234. 2010 KY39, Mars crossing NEO
  235. 2010 JC170, Earth crossing NEO
  236. 2010 JM151, Earth and Mars crosser, MOID=0.1093
  237. 2010 HZ108, Apollo, MOID=0.1079
  238. 2010 KX7, PHA, MOID = 0.0319, Aten
  239. 2010 KW7, cometary orbit, i=147. Update: Comet C/2010 KW7 (WISE), perihelion at 2.57 AU
  240. 2010 JC147, cometary orbit
  241. 2010 JH124, cometary orbit, e = 0.89, q = 2.7 AU, i = 54 degrees
  242. 2010 JH87, Earth and Mars crosser
  243. 2010 JG87, short period comet-like orbit (e=0.94)
  244. 2010 JF87, PHA (MOID=0.0489)
  245. 2010 JE87, PHA (MOID=0.0329)
  246. 2010 JD87, Venus, Earth & Mars crosser
  247. Comet C/2010 J4 (WISE), orbit updates 1 and 2
  248. 2010 HZ104, MOID = 0.0197
  249. 2010 JA43, an NEO observed only by WISE but with 21 observations spanning 3 days due to its far Southern latitude (β = -66o)
  250. 2010 HX107, MOID=0.0144
  251. 2010 JN33, high inclination (i=55) NEO
  252. 2010 HA104, PHA (MOID=0.0437)
  253. 2010 HZ103, PHA (MOID=0.0334)
  254. 2010 HW81, Mars, Earth, Venus & Mercury crosser (e=0.73)
  255. 2010 HR80, 0.6 km dia Mars, Earth & Venus crosser
  256. 2010 HQ80, 0.4 km dia PHA, MOID=0.0111
  257. 2010 HD33, a biggish NEO.
  258. 2010 CT149, new WISE observations show this has a comet-like orbit with a=25.5 AU and e=0.93.
  259. Comet C/2010 A4 (Siding Spring), new WISE observations of this comet.
  260. 2006 JT. WISE recovered this NEO so it now has a very good orbit.
  261. Comet C/2010 FB87 (WISE-Garradd), parabolic orbit with perihelion at 2.85 AU, discovered as an asteroid by WISE. Update
  262. 2010 HO20, in 2:3 resonance with Jupiter
  263. 2010 GW147, a Centaur ranging from 5.45 to 30.53 AU from the Sun
  264. 2010 GV147, high eccentricity Aten, Mars, Earth, Venus & Mercury crosser
  265. 2009 JO2, WISE recovered this Aten, so it now has a rather good orbit MOID = 0.0552
  266. 2010 GR75, Mars Earth & Venus crosser. Update 20 July 2013: recovered in July 2013 at Mauna Kea.
  267. 2010 GQ75, perihelion at 0.33 AU, comet-like orbit
  268. 2010 GP67, MOID=0.0171
  269. Comet C/2010 G3 (WISE), parabolic orbit, updates 5/8/10, 5/24/10, 6/14/10, 6/22/10. perihelion 4.91 AU
  270. 2010 GH65, comet-like orbit NEO
  271. 2010 GW64, perihelion at 3.7 AU, comet-like orbit
  272. 2010 GX62, PHA MOID = 0.0118 AU
  273. 2010 GW62, Mars, Earth & Venus crosser
  274. 2010 FH92, perihelion at 5.74 AU, comet-like orbit
  275. 2010 GF25, Mars, Earth, Venus & Mercury crosser
  276. 2010 GE25, MOID=0.2158
  277. 2010 GK23, eccentric (e=0.71) Earth crosser
  278. 2010 GJ23, MOID=0.3697
  279. 2010 FJ81, MOID = 0.0888
  280. 2010 FH81, PHA (MOID=0.0347)
  281. 2010 FG81, (MOID=0.0191)
  282. 2010 FC81, PHA (MOID=0.0223)
  283. 2010 FB81, (MOID=0.0401)
  284. 2010 FA81, nearly big enough to be a PHA (MOID=0.0337) Update 6 Feb 2014: recovered by Dave Tholen, new orbit gives MOID = 0.0324.
  285. 2010 FZ80, Earth crosser
  286. 2010 FY80, comet-like orbit
  287. 2010 FX80, MOID=0.5638
  288. 2010 EX119, an Earth crosser
  289. Comet C/2010 E3 (WISE)
  290. 2010 EN44, (MOID=0.0187)
  291. Comet C/2010 D4 (WISE), with perihelion distance of 7.2 AU!
  292. 2010 EH20, a fairly big NEO
  293. Comet C/2010 D3 (WISE), a parabolic comet with perihelion at 4.25 AU [Update]
  294. 2010 DJ77, Aten
  295. 2010 DH77, Earth crosser, MOID=0.1294
  296. 2010 DG77, PHA (MOID = 0.0061 AU)
  297. 2010 EX11, Aten, (MOID = 0.0281)
  298. Comet C/2010 D2 (WISE)
  299. 2010 DM56, big PHA (MOID = 0.0068 AU)
  300. 2010 DJ56, Earth Crosser
  301. 2010 DH56, Earth Crosser
  302. 2010 DG56, Dead Comet? Actually not dead: Comet C/2010 DG56 (WISE) . Update: 8/12/10
  303. 2010 DK34, Earth & Venus Crosser
  304. 2010 CN141, very dark PHA (MOID = 0.0431 AU)
  305. 2010 DM21, Earth Crosser
  306. 2010 CR140, i=75 Trojan?
  307. 2010 CP140, Earth Crosser
  308. Comet P/2010 D1 (WISE)
  309. 2010 CC55, Earth Crosser
  310. 2010 CA55, Earth & Venus Crosser
  311. Comet P/2009WJ50 (La Sagra). Previously classified as an asteroid until WISE saw a coma.
  312. 2010 CU19, high inclination and eccentricity Main Belt Asteroid
  313. 2010 CH18, MOID = 0.3107
  314. 2010 CG18, MOID = 0.1260
  315. 1996 GQ, recovered by WISE giving a good orbit (MOID = 0.0201)
  316. 2010 CO1, PHA (MOID = 0.0224). Update 10 Sep 2015: recovered by WISE, MOID still 0.0224.
  317. Comet P/2010 B2 (WISE)
  318. 2010 AG79, MOID = 0.2382
  319. 2010 AB78, the first NEO discovered by WISE. Update: MOID=0.2084
Notes:
MOID is the Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance
PHA is a Potentially Hazardous Asteroid, with MOID < 0.05 AU
and absolute magnitude brighter than 22. AU is astronomical unit, 149.6 million km or 93 million miles
i is the inclination
Apollo asteroids have a > 1 AU but perihelion at < 1.017 AU so they are mainly outside the Earth's orbit
Aten asteroids have a < 1 AU but aphelion at > 0.983 AU so they are mainly interior to the Earth's orbit

JPL's NEO office maintains a list of WISE discoveries, and the MPC maintains a breakdown of NEO discoveries by type and discoverer. WISE is finding about 20-30 percent of the NEOs discovered in 2010.


WISE Home Page

Last modified 30 Nov 2016